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    Sustainable farm shares space with a golf course

    The ping of a golf club head striking against a golf ball and the yell “fore” are not sounds usually associated with a farm, but if you are involved in Fairway Farms in Lemont, Illinois, they are common noises that Angelica Carmen, the farm’s manager and Sustainability Specialist, says come with her work location. Angelica was the guest speaker at Chicago Farmers’ October 21, 2019 meeting.

    Angelica manages and developed the farm that is located on the site of a former gravel parking lot at Cog Hill Golf and Country Club in Lemont and backs up to one of the four golf courses that have made Cog Hill famous among avid and pro golfers. The two-year-old sustainable farm boasts 4,500 square feet of planting space, 25 raised beds growing 100 different varieties of heirloom plants and edible flowers that are used in Cog Hill’s banquet facilities, 12 beehives (apiary) whose honey is sold to the community, a pumpkin patch, and a closed-loop composting program that uses kitchen waste mixed with garden refuse to create fertile compost that is used on the farm and, at the same time, mitigates methane-producing landfill waste.  “In the 2.5 years it has been in operation, the farm has diverted over 7,500 pounds of kitchen waste from landfills,” said a proud Angelica.

    A graduate of Loyola University Chicago, Angelica holds a degree in communication and environmental advocacy and leadership. She has had agriculture internships with Uncommon Ground, which has the first certified organic rooftop farm in the United States, and Loyola’s Urban Agriculture program. Aspiring to be a chef one day, Angelica said her internship with Uncommon Ground taught her how to grow sustainably and to grow for restaurant chefs. Loyola taught her how to manage a sustainable operation.

    Fairway Farms does not have electricity or mechanized equipment, does not use herbicides, irrigates from trenches dug under the fairways and a nearby pond, uses mulch that is composed of downed trees from the golf course, and creates its growing materials by recycling things no longer used by the golf course and adapting the items for growing use; for example, old golf cart beds have become planters and wooden turf pallets are turned on their sides to display hanging planters.

    “Golf courses can be positive stewards of the environment,” said Angelica. “The golf course has cut its use of fungicide and insecticide by 60 percent as a result of its connection with the farm and our sustainable processes. Additionally, the farm has saved the kitchen roughly $9,000 in produce costs annually.”

    Today, a wildflower berm that backs up to the golf course supports the apiary, which produced 140 pounds of honey this season. While most of the honey is sold to the community, some honey goes to Cog Hill’s kitchens when needed for recipes.  The farm has a partnership with Pollyanna Brewing Company and grew basil varieties to brew Dubs Delight Blonde Basil Ale. The farm also has planted a lavender bed dedicated to the brewery for Cog Hill’s 2019 ‘Par for the Course American Pale Ale,’ which is available in the golf course’s dining areas.

    Pollinator gardens, “Monarchs in the Rough,” dot the golf courses and bluebird houses and bat boxes, constructed by area students, are erected throughout Cog Hill.

    Prior to developing the farm, Angelica worked with Cog Hill’s Director of Grounds Operations, Chris Flick, who wanted to delve into sustainability and spearhead a sustainability program for on and off the golf course. Angelica’s job was to grow the culinary farm on a golf course and that she has done.

    “We have partnerships with a number of area restaurants and Pollyanna Brewery and we are reaching out to schools,” said Angelica. “Our mission is to educate. Sustainability is giving back more than you take. We are enhancing the ecosystem and reusing as much as we possibly can to to reduce harmful emissions. Fairway Farms grows without any chemicals or synthetics and I see biodiversity strengthening from year to year.”

    To increase people’s awareness of Fairway Farms and its sustainability, Cog Hill and its farm were the hosts of two Farm to Table dinners that were held on grounds overlooking one of the golf courses.  The produce used on the menu came from the farm and was served.

    “Our first dinner served 50 people in August 2018 and the second dinner this September had 70 people,” said Angelica. “Ninety percent of the menu was sourced from the farm. We plan to increase the number of dinners to three or four each year because they are great showcases of our programs and inspiring to people.”

    There will be several Farm Dinner events open to the public held throughout the 2020 season, with official dates coming soon. Event information is available on Cog Hill’s website, www.coghillgolf.com/growing-green.

    Written by Denise Faris, The Chicago Farmers Newsletter Editor