Articles

    An outdoor history museum in Naperville welcomes The Chicago Farmers

    The Chicago Farmers were transported back to the mid-19th century when Summer Tour 2017 took the group to Naper Settlement in Naperville, Illinois. A perfect summer day, delicious lunch, and charming Naper Settlement staff members showed TCF what industry and agriculture were like in the area the last 180 years.

    Our hostesses for the day were Debbie Grinnell, Vice President, Advancement and Campus Development, and Donna Sack, Vice President, Community Engagement and Audience. Ms. Grinnell noted that she and Ms. Sack had attended Chicago Farmers meetings over the last year and very much they enjoyed them. They also participated in TCF’s visit to the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences last summer.

    “We wanted to be able to offer something in return to The Chicago Farmers and we thought a visit to our site would do that,” said Ms. Grinnell.

    She noted that Naper Settlement sits on 12 of the 212 acres donated to Naperville in the 1930s. Caroline Martin Mitchell, the daughter of George Martin, a successful 19th century businessman, deeded the acreage and the Martin family Victorian mansion that was built in 1883, to Naperville with the understanding that the property would be put to good use for the community and that the mansion would become a city museum. Hence, a hospital, schools, river walk, cemetery, municipal buildings, and Naper Settlement now sit on the property that at one time was the Martin’s farmland and rock quarry pit. Today, the Martin mansion and 30 buildings and ancillary sites features “allow Naper Settlement to tell the story of an agrarian community that transformed into a technoburb,” said Ms. Grinnell.

    And, indeed, there is an audience for the story. Thirty-five thousand teachers and students from 12 rural, suburban, and urban counties in Illinois annually visit Naper Settlement in addition to the many other visitors that are split evenly between Naperville and other suburbs.

    Naper Settlement, which serves as an outdoor history museum, operates on a $4.5 million budget; $3 million of which comes from the City of Naperville with the remaining $1.5 million raised by the Naperville Heritage Society. This fundraising arm was created in 1969 when a group formed to save St. John’s Episcopal Church in downtown Naperville from demolition. The church held its first service in 1865. The group raised enough funds to salvage the wooden Gothic Revival church and have it moved to the grounds of the Martin Mitchell Mansion. The church was renamed Century Memorial Church and has been restored to look as it did in the 1870s.

    After lunch, our group left the visitor center, which houses a temporary exhibit reflecting on the Naperville community’s agricultural roots on the first floor and a permanent exhibit on Naperville’s settlement and town development in the lower level. We then went outdoors to tour the museum and view the historic buildings that dot the Naper Settlement site. A blacksmith, the Naperville Clarion Print Shop and Paw Paw Post Office are among the first buildings that are encountered as visitors begin a leisurely stroll around the grounds. “Interpreters” educate visitors on the work of the blacksmith, relate how a newspaper of 1869 printed the news, and share details about the early days of the postal system and the fact that Naperville was a stop on the stage coach route. Young teens and children dressed in period garb can be seen around the post office playing games that children of that era would have played.

    As the walk moves on, visitors continue to be transported back in time and immersed in history. A stop at an 1830s log cabin that originally stood in Jonesboro, Illinois, allows visitors to interact with two children performing children’s tasks of the 1800s – churning butter and carding wool to prepare it for the spinning wheel. The adult “interpreter” talks about farming of the period. He noted, for example, that the 19th century farmer would produce 30 bushels of corn per acre and sell it for 30 cents a bushel, which would be $30 today. Similarly, the farmer produced about 24 bushels of wheat per acre and sold it for 80 cents per bushel, $80 in today’s terms.

    The walk along winding paths takes visitors past a Conestoga covered wagon that transported pioneers westward in the 19th century, a reconstructed one room school house from the 1840s that originally stood at Route 59 and 83rd Street, an 1843 home known as the “halfway house” because it stood halfway on the route between Naperville and Aurora, and the beautifully restored Martin Mitchell Mansion. But there is still more to see: a farm cellar, smokehouse and windmill from the 1900s, the Century Memorial Chapel, the Murray Building, which was a residence and business dating from the 1840s in downtown Naperville, and more.

    While there is much to see at Naper Settlement today, the history museum has plans for the addition of an Agricultural Interpretive Center in the near future, Ms. Sack told TCF’s group. Currently, Naper Settlement is in the process of collecting artifacts, stories and funds for the $4 million center.

    “There is a story to be told about how Naperville shifted from an agricultural base to suburbanization as it welcomed industry and a more diverse population,” said Ms. Sack. “There is so much more to tell. Our goal is to continue to focus and enhance our conversation about the importance of history, social studies and civics.”

    The 5,000 square feet Agricultural Interpretive Center addition to Naper Settlement will be located close to the half-way house and will tell the story of agriculture from 19th and 20th and centuries in the context of agriculture today. It will show agriculture’s innovation through displays of past and present farm implements, facilitate discussions about the business side of agriculture and the skills that are needed to be successful, provide an ag-science learning lab for interactive activities, experiments and experiences, and the center also will include the story of women in agriculture, Ms. Sack said.

    “We want to excite children about working in agriculture and agriculture related professions,” said Ms. Sack. “Agriculture is a huge business in Illinois and the center will show that. The center will provide data that will inform conversations about the evolving science and business of food production today, and how agriculture will feed the world’s population of tomorrow.”

    TCF member Ray Brownfield is a long-time resident of Naperville and an ardent supporter of Naper Settlement and its plans for the Agricultural Center. “I have spent time talking with representatives of Naper Settlement about agriculture and where it is going,” Ray shared with TCF’s group. “We have talked about growing crops, GMOs and organic farming. I’m a stakeholder here. I believe the Agricultural Interpretive Center can become a destination for people to learn about agriculture. It is a very exciting endeavor.”

    Austrian Study Tour Sets a Record High with Traveler Count and Alpine Altitude

    By Jim Ward, Chicago Farmers Travel Chairman

    Chicago Farmers and the three generation Austrian farm family.

    Twenty-five Chicago Farmers members and guests spent the week of April 22nd to 29th learning about the diverse agriculture and historic cultural features of Austria. The group traveled 777 miles in a comfortable motor coach and a short distance by cruise ship on the Danube River with the leadership of our charming tour guide, Silvia.

    Our Austrian Airlines 777 delivered us to the Vienna airport on schedule, and Silvia and driver Tomas took us to Graz, Austria’s No. 2 city, with a lunch of pumpkin seed soup and Austrian pancakes on the way. Graz was not bombed during World War II, so historic buildings were in their original condition.

    Next morning, the group headed for Piber, the site of the famous Lippizanner stud farm and training stables. Our guide expressed the Austrian people’s gratitude to General Patton for rescuing the Spanish Riding School’s horses from the food shortage of post World War II. We saw 40 new foals with their mothers. They are born black and turn white as they age. Also on display were new riders in training.

    A short drive through Austria’s “fruit basket” area revealed that most orchards use a technique whereby trees are trained/pruned to grow on trellises, which allows high production and easy harvesting. The evening was spent at a country inn.

    In the afternoon, we drove west to the mountain area to visit an Alpine dairy farm. The Kettner family’s hillside home faced the snow-capped mountain peaks and looked over a sloping pasture. It was a perfect setting for our group photo with three generations of the family. Their modern dairy barn houses a 70 cow herd of Brown Swiss and Holsteins, with modern self-service robotic milking equipment. Haying steep mountain grassland and moving heifers to high summer pastures were part of the routine.

    Like U. S. dairy farmers, the Austrians have the problems of low milk prices and government regulations. The Kettners work with other farms, forming a cooperative to own expensive farm machinery. They also lease pasture land from a nearby church in the valley.

    By Tuesday, we had reached Salzburg and were ready to tour the “Sound of Music” city with our guide leading the bus in songs from the romantic musical. We began the day with the Mirabell gardens and moved through the various sites chosen to tell the story of the von Trapp family’s adventures. A side trip to the lake village of Mondsee allowed viewing the “wedding church” used in the movie. We had the evening on our own, and some of us chose to hear a Mozart style musical presentation with costumed singers. The setting was in an old abbey with vaulted ceilings and sparkling chandeliers.

    Wednesday was our busy day with a fruit farm visit, with our host walking us through his row-on-row blossoming orchards of pear and apple trees. Some of the trees were 300 years old dating back to Hapsburg ruler Maria Theresa, who promoted educational, commercial and agricultural reform in the late 1700s. Then to his inn’s dining room where he served us samples of a spirit he had aged and distilled from the fruit, followed by a generous luncheon.

    Next, we were on to Melk and a visit to the imposing Benedictine Monastery overlooking the Danube. It wasfilled with great art treasures and the business manager explained about their role in farming and forestry. They are one of the largest land owners in Austria and income from the property and tourist admissions sustain the maintenance of the aging structure.

    The evening was spent in a charming inn on the banks of the Danube at Emmensdorf. Thursday morning, we met with the Monastery’s business manager at his farm headquarters and inspected some of the giant equipment for row crop production (potatoes, sugar beets, soybeans, and canola) that also is used for logging the forest property. Wood chips are used to heat the Monastery and local municipal buildings.

    Next came our river cruise on the Danube, with castles on the shore and terraced vineyards on the river bank. Our guide told us they were originally built by the Romans, hundreds of year ago.

    On our way to Vienna, Austria’s capital city, we passed the golden blossoms in the rape seed fields. The crop would be harvested to produce canola oil. Friday was a bus tour past Vienna’s many attractions, including the State Opera, the Belvedere Palace, Parliament, and many museums. We had the afternoon on our own.

    As luck would have it, our drop-off point at the center of the city was near the Spanish Riding School!  Several riders had the beautiful white stallions posing for a photo shoot, so we did some photo shoots of our own and stopped in at the School’s gift shop. An afternoon of museum visiting finished off our sample of Vienna’s wonderful attractions. Austria is a well visited country; forty percent of the country’s national income is attributed to tourism.

    Our farewell dinner featured a generous serving of wiener schnitzel and sacher torte for dessert. The private dining room provided music by a local pianist. Our guide surprised us with the gift of a torte cake to take home as a remembrance, which we shared at the May 8th Chicago Farmers luncheon.

    We were up early on Saturday to board our Austrian Airline 777 and had sunshine all the way home. Another Study Tour and the improvement of our knowledge of farming around the world and a benefit for our Scholarship Fund had come to an end.

    Click here to see photos from the trip!

    RECORD NUMBER VISIT SUNNY SPAIN ON FARM AND CULTURAL STUDY TOUR

    By Jim Ward, TCF Travel Chairman

    A record breaking 25 travelers embarked on Iberian Airlines for a Study Tour of Central Spain in late September, enjoying perfect weather and a blend of farm visits and historic places. The week-long visit was capped by a “farewell dinner” at the Café de la Opera with performances by local singers during the meal.

    Our walking encyclopedic guide “Gari” took us to Toledo for our first stop. The city is known for its production of steel blades, so we toured a workshop noted for its swords and knives. The next day we moved to the country, and stopped to photograph a lineup of Don Quixote windmills. Next we went on to a Saffron Cooperative, learning about this rare crop in the group’s museum.

    By mid-morning we visited a Manchego cheese factory. The cheese has a unique flavor due to its sheep’s milk origin. For our lunch we stopped in Villa Castilla for a generous meal of local dishes. Next, back to Toledo for a walking tour of the historic city, noted for its cathedral and castles.

    Wednesday morning we were on the road again to visit the world famous Osborne winery, a 200 year old firm that is family owned, yet has an international reputation. They showed us the complete cycle of production and offered us a generous sample of their production.

    After a hearty lunch at a local restaurant, we saw one of Spain’s largest cattle ranches, visiting a Charolais beef breeder. The host’s prize bull had just returned from a Festival in Southern Spain with the runner up ribbon. The rancher’s daughter was on hand and introduced her three sons, who are learning the ropes on the ranch. The rancher also was a big game hunter and invited us to a tour of his trophy hall, a separate building housing his mounted big game trophy heads and show awards. When asked what animal was hardest to bring down, he answered, “A wild buffalo.”

    On the road again Thursday morning, the other side of the cattle business was our morning stop—a bull fighting training ranch owned by a retired (at age 35) matador and his brother. We were given a ride in a tram and driven to the pasture. One of his cowboys whistled for the herd and they came running for feed pellets as we watched from the safety of the tram. The “novice” bulls were not aggressive and some ate the pellets from the cowboy’s fingers.

    Back at the ranch complex we toured the practice bull ring and presented our host with the traditional Chicago Farmers’ cap as a souvenir of our visit.

    Nearby we stopped at a wheat, barley and rape seed farm, with most of the grain crops already harvested. The farmer was proud of his well-maintained equipment that enabled him to farm his acreage all by himself, and, he explained, “365 days a year.” He does have some extra hands during the peak seasons.

    We stayed overnight at the ancient town of Vallodolid and headed out on Friday to visit the Planasa Corporation, one of Europe’s biggest horticultural firms. Their role is to improve the quality and quantity of plant and vegetable production by supplying seeds for growers around the world. We visited their fields and vineyards and were impressed by their techniques.

    Our luncheon stop was just outside the walled village of Gomezerracin. A camera crew was shooting a TV commercial against the town’s wall and we had to pass their security to enter the restaurant! Inside we were served the unusual delicacy of roast suckling pig with flan custard for dessert.

    Next stop Segovia, noted for one of the surviving Roman Aqueducts, as well as for their ancient city wall and cathedrals. Then back to our starting place, Madrid. It is Spain’s largest city and famous for its many museums and the nation’s palace.

    On this final day of our study tour, our city guide gave us a compressed visit past the major attractions from our tour bus seats. We stopped at the Palace and saw the colorful changing of the guard ceremony. During the afternoon we toured on our own, many choosing to visit the world famous Prado Museum.

    The Café de la Opera restaurant was the place for our group picture, with a colorful mosaic wall as the background. During the four course meal we were serenaded by four local opera stars and selections from classic operas.

    On Sunday, we were off to the Madrid airport and the Iberian flight back to the United States, leaving mid-morning and arriving home mid-afternoon as we chased the sun west. It was another successful International Study Tour and a generous contribution to the Chicago Farmers Scholarship Fund.

    Chicago Farmers visit Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences

    Students from Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences (CHSAS) have attended The Chicago Farmers’ meetings numerous times. As recipients of TCF scholarships, the students are always welcome and enjoyable to meet. On August 11, it was our turn to visit their school for TCF’s summer program. TCF has visited in the past, but we learn something new each time we visit and we meet students we have not previously met.

    Located on the far Southwest Side of Chicago, CHSAS educates 720 students in freshman through senior years. It receives 3,000 applications each year for 180 freshmen seats, according to Bill Hook, principal at CHSAS. Students are selected through a random lottery and hail from all parts of the city; some from nearby neighborhoods and others from the far North Side with one-way commutes as much as 1.5 hours.

    “The University of Illinois receives the majority of our graduates, but all of the land grant colleges are popular destinations for our students,” said Hook. “Thirty percent of our students become ag majors in college and two-thirds don’t pursue agriculture as a study. However, 100 percent of our students are well served by the program at CHAS. They learn important skills and become responsible young adults. We thank The Chicago Farmers for their scholarships and it is great when our students attend your meetings. They offer discussions about current events and wonderful topics that we connect with our curriculum.”

    Hook went on to say, “CHSAS has a 92 percent graduation rate and 83 percent of our students continue on to college. CHSAS is everything that is good about education.”

    Opened in 1985, CHSAS and its fields sit on 78 acres, of which 38 acres are farmed. The site has been owned by Chicago Public Schools for 100 years and was leased by a family that farmed it until 1980. Although CPS had decided to sell the land, the neighborhood urged the system to keep the farm and build a school. Hence, CHSAS was built, one of only two such schools in the United States.

    A short video narrated by Max Armstrong gave us an overview of CHSAS before we started out on our tour. “The school takes urban students and makes them aware of agribusiness and where food comes from,” related Armstrong. Following the video, we divided into groups and hooked up with a pair of tour guides. The guides were seniors and included Jennifer Ventura, Shane La Faire, Danielle Wood, Carleton Johnson, Caitlyn McFadden, and Emily Neeson. Each student had either spent the summer in an internship at a U.S. university or traveled abroad for an internship.

    CHSAS offers a unique approach to education, said Hook. It has college prep education and ag courses. After sampling the six pathways offered by the school (Ag Education, Horticulture, Ag Finance, Food Science, Animal Science, and Ag Mechanics) during freshman and sophomore years, students rank the pathways in order of their preference and then pursue one of them during junior and senior years.

    The livestock, which includes horses, cows (students built a shelter for the cows), pigs, goats, chickens, and turkeys, provide hands-on experience for students. The horse manure serves as fertilizer for the school’s crops, which are sold at the school’s farm stand that students manage. Lettuce raised by students was sold to Cooper’s Hawk Restaurant. Students in the Horticulture Pathway mount exhibits for the annual Chicago Garden Show at Navy Pier in March. Half of the honey produced at the school is sold at the farm stand and the other half is sold to Eli’s.

    Caitlyn McFadden, who is studying in the Ag Education Pathway, kept us informed along with her partner guide, Shane LaFaire, who is in the Horticulture Pathway. Caitlyn is considering attending the University of Tennessee, where she completed an internship this summer, and Shane is looking at either the University of Iowa or Iowa State University. “I picked CHSAS because it is a good school, but I ended up falling in love with ag,” said Caitlyn.

    In addition to learning about and caring for animals, students have the opportunity to learn about honey production, hydroponic farming and the raising of fish (tilapia) that are sold to DiCola’s, a local seafood shop. Caitlyn noted that a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) program is being added this year. Baseball, football, soccer, and water polo (the school has a pool) are offered.

    The day culminated with lunch that featured student baked zucchini bread and hamburgers and Italian sausage that were made with the meat from the cows and pigs raised at CHSAS.

    “This is an inspirational place,” said Barbara Clark, TCF president, as the day was wrapping up. “CHSAS is a good news story about Chicago’s public schools. It was a great opportunity to be here today.”