International Study Tours

Austrian Study Tour Sets a Record High with Traveler Count and Alpine Altitude

By Jim Ward, Chicago Farmers Travel Chairman


Chicago Farmers and the three generation Austrian farm family.

Twenty-five Chicago Farmers members and guests spent the week of April 22nd to 29th learning about the diverse agriculture and historic cultural features of Austria. The group traveled 777 miles in a comfortable motor coach and a short distance by cruise ship on the Danube River with the leadership of our charming tour guide, Silvia.

Our Austrian Airlines 777 delivered us to the Vienna airport on schedule, and Silvia and driver Tomas took us to Graz, Austria’s No. 2 city, with a lunch of pumpkin seed soup and Austrian pancakes on the way. Graz was not bombed during World War II, so historic buildings were in their original condition.

Next morning, the group headed for Piber, the site of the famous Lippizanner stud farm and training stables. Our guide expressed the Austrian people’s gratitude to General Patton for rescuing the Spanish Riding School’s horses from the food shortage of post World War II. We saw 40 new foals with their mothers. They are born black and turn white as they age. Also on display were new riders in training.

A short drive through Austria’s “fruit basket” area revealed that most orchards use a technique whereby trees are trained/pruned to grow on trellises, which allows high production and easy harvesting. The evening was spent at a country inn.

In the afternoon, we drove west to the mountain area to visit an Alpine dairy farm. The Kettner family’s hillside home faced the snow-capped mountain peaks and looked over a sloping pasture. It was a perfect setting for our group photo with three generations of the family. Their modern dairy barn houses a 70 cow herd of Brown Swiss and Holsteins, with modern self-service robotic milking equipment. Haying steep mountain grassland and moving heifers to high summer pastures were part of the routine.

Like U. S. dairy farmers, the Austrians have the problems of low milk prices and government regulations. The Kettners work with other farms, forming a cooperative to own expensive farm machinery. They also lease pasture land from a nearby church in the valley.

By Tuesday, we had reached Salzburg and were ready to tour the “Sound of Music” city with our guide leading the bus in songs from the romantic musical. We began the day with the Mirabell gardens and moved through the various sites chosen to tell the story of the von Trapp family’s adventures. A side trip to the lake village of Mondsee allowed viewing the “wedding church” used in the movie. We had the evening on our own, and some of us chose to hear a Mozart style musical presentation with costumed singers. The setting was in an old abbey with vaulted ceilings and sparkling chandeliers.

Wednesday was our busy day with a fruit farm visit, with our host walking us through his row-on-row blossoming orchards of pear and apple trees. Some of the trees were 300 years old dating back to Hapsburg ruler Maria Theresa, who promoted educational, commercial and agricultural reform in the late 1700s. Then to his inn’s dining room where he served us samples of a spirit he had aged and distilled from the fruit, followed by a generous luncheon.

Next, we were on to Melk and a visit to the imposing Benedictine Monastery overlooking the Danube. It wasfilled with great art treasures and the business manager explained about their role in farming and forestry. They are one of the largest land owners in Austria and income from the property and tourist admissions sustain the maintenance of the aging structure.

The evening was spent in a charming inn on the banks of the Danube at Emmensdorf. Thursday morning, we met with the Monastery’s business manager at his farm headquarters and inspected some of the giant equipment for row crop production (potatoes, sugar beets, soybeans, and canola) that also is used for logging the forest property. Wood chips are used to heat the Monastery and local municipal buildings.

Next came our river cruise on the Danube, with castles on the shore and terraced vineyards on the river bank. Our guide told us they were originally built by the Romans, hundreds of year ago.

On our way to Vienna, Austria’s capital city, we passed the golden blossoms in the rape seed fields. The crop would be harvested to produce canola oil. Friday was a bus tour past Vienna’s many attractions, including the State Opera, the Belvedere Palace, Parliament, and many museums. We had the afternoon on our own.

As luck would have it, our drop-off point at the center of the city was near the Spanish Riding School!  Several riders had the beautiful white stallions posing for a photo shoot, so we did some photo shoots of our own and stopped in at the School’s gift shop. An afternoon of museum visiting finished off our sample of Vienna’s wonderful attractions. Austria is a well visited country; forty percent of the country’s national income is attributed to tourism.

Our farewell dinner featured a generous serving of wiener schnitzel and sacher torte for dessert. The private dining room provided music by a local pianist. Our guide surprised us with the gift of a torte cake to take home as a remembrance, which we shared at the May 8th Chicago Farmers luncheon.

We were up early on Saturday to board our Austrian Airline 777 and had sunshine all the way home. Another Study Tour and the improvement of our knowledge of farming around the world and a benefit for our Scholarship Fund had come to an end.

Click here to see photos from the trip!


Since 2002, members of the Chicago Farmers have traveled to a variety of foreign destinations, including countries in Central and South America, Europe and Cuba to focus on both the culture and agriculture of those destinations, which differ significantly from Midwest row crop production agriculture. In September of 2016, a group of Chicago Farmers travelers went overseas to Spain for a week. While in Spain, the travelers went on several walking tours of all sorts and ate an abundance of delicious, local food. We heard nothing but wonderful things about the trip!